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Irk Valley Community School

Respect

The importance of valuing others, listening to different viewpoints, taking care of belongings, manners, appreciating the diversity which exists in our community and beyond

Excellence

The determination to reach the highest standards, every day.

Aspiration

The desire to grow and develop, achieving the best for ourselves and each other.

Cooperation

The knowledge that working with others, asking for help when needed and supporting others to develop are the foundations of growth.

Happiness

The importance of joy in what we do, discovering our strengths and using them.

Grammar

Learn how to use sentences with different forms: statement, question, exclamation, command.

  • Statement Sentences: Are written to inform or explain.  They end with a full stop.  Eg. There were lots of people at the supermarket.
  • Question Sentences: Are interrogative and ask you something.  They end with a question mark.  Eg. What did you have for lunch?  or   Where are you going?
  • Command Sentences: Are written to tell you to do something.  They are often urgent or angry and can be very short.  Eg. Put your feet down. or Go to the shop.
  • Exclamation Sentences:  Usually begin with 'What' or 'How.'  It's a full sentence expressing a strong emotion and ends with an exclamation mark.  Eg. You're late again!  or  What a beautiful day!

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Learn how to use expanded noun phrases to describe and specify.

Initially, when we begin writing we used a simple noun phrase to introduce a person, object or animal but give no extra description.  Eg. 'the cup.' / 'the sky'  

An expanded noun phrase is made up of a noun and one of more adjective to describe. When writing an expanded noun phrase remember we need to include a comma ( , ) between each of the adjectives. Eg. 'the red, spotty cup.'  /  'the bright, blue sky.'

Noun: a person, place, object or animal.   Adjective: a describing word.

 

Noun Phrase

Expanded Noun Phrase

The cup was on the table.

The

red, spotty

cup

was on the

hard, wooden

table.

  

adjectives

noun

 adjectivesnoun

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Use co-ordination and some subordination to join clauses.

Coordination:  A coordinating conjunction is used to link two parts of a sentence that are both of equal importance connecting ideas together.  Eg. I had a shower and brushed my teeth.  /   Would you prefer cereal or toast?  /  I went to bed very late, so I am very tired today."

To help remember these we use the acronym FANBOYS:

            

Subordination:  A subordinating conjunction is used to join the main and subordinate clause together.  The main clause can be written and understood on its own whereas, the subordinate clause does not make sense. Eg. Samantha's feet had been hurting all day because her shoes were too tight.  /   I'm staying in although I'd rather go out  /  Let's go for a walk while it's still light outside.

To help remember these we use the acronym I SAW A WABUB:

            

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Learn how to use apostrophes for contracted forms/ possessive (singular) correctly.

Using an apostrophe for a contracted form means to shorten two words by taking out some letters, replacing them with the apostrophe.  Eg.

can not - can'

The 'no' have been taken out of the word and replaced by the apostrophe.

I will - I'll

The 'wi' have been taken out of the word and replaced by the apostrophe.

Using an apostrophe to show possession or a possessive apostrophe means it is used to shows that one thing belongs to or is connected to something.  Eg. 

The dog's leash

This shows that the leash belongs to the dog.

The girl's doll

This shows that the doll belongs to the girl.

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Add suffixes to spell most words correctly in your writing.

A suffix is a letter or group of letters added to the end of a word and changes the word's meaning.  Sometimes a suffix changes the original (root) word's spelling; you might have to double the last letter. Eg.  When adding 'ed' to skip you double the 'p' so it becomes 'skipped'.

The suffixes we will work to be successful at applying in Year 2 are:

          

 

Some examples of words containing a suffix are:

mixer,  enjoyment,  quickly,  colourful, happiness,  careless

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Understand and spell homophones correctly.

A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word but they have different meanings and spellings. 

The main homophones to recognise and spell in year two are: see/ sea, be/ bee, blue/ blew, bear/ bare, flour/ flower, hear/ here, whole/ hole, one/ won, sun/ son, no/ know, night/ knight, to/ too/ two, quite/ quiet, night/ knight, new/ knew, not/ knot, they're/ there/ their.

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